Bill Yopp
An Historical Account

Bill Yopp, Confederate Drummer


Left: William "Ten Cent Bill" Yopp, Drummer and Body Servant
Right: Thomas Yopp, Captain
Confederate States Army
14 Georgia Volunteer Infantry Regiment
Photo Cited: The Boys In Butternut



In a November 29, 1931 article titled "Georgia Negro Served in Two Wars and Went Around World," a special correspondent to The New York Times states, "On the Yopp plantation, Bill played with the white children at the big house and later became the personal servant of Captain Yopp, accompanying him when he went to war.  On two occasions when the Southern officer was wounded, Bill nursed him back to health, and after the war he was of great help to the Yopp family."1  The New York Times reported in a 1919 article that William "Ten Cent Bill" Yopp was fifteen years old when  Bill rescued  Confederate Captain Thomas Yopp from the Civil War battlefields.2

Date: March 5, 2008

Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue affixed the Seal of the Executive Department and proclaimed April 2008 as Confederate History Month in Georgia. In this State of Georgia document, Governor Perdue acknowledged a man of African descent, "One such soldier who made a significant contribution to the state was Bill Yopp of Laurens County who served for four years in Co. H, 14th Regiment Georgia Infantry. . . . Upon his death on June 3, 1936, Bill Yopp was buried with full Confederate military honors in the Confederate cemetery in Marietta [Georgia]."3

Works Cited

1"'Ten-Cent' Bill Yopp Visits His Old Home: Georgia Negro Served In Two Wars and Went Around WorldFond of Reunions." New York: The New York Times. 29 Nov. 1931. Web. 1 May 2010.

2"Negro Plays Santa To Old Confederates." New York: The New York Times. 1 Dec. 1919. Web. 1 May 2010.

3Perdue, Sonny. "Confederate History Month." Georgia.gov. Web. 22 May 2010.

 


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